Zucchini, Pumpkin and Squash Bugs

The two zucchini I picked today. My hand for size reference.

Today, I harvested the first two zucchini from my garden.  One of the two I probably should have picked a couple of days ago, but at least it is done now.  I weighed them together in my spring scale and got 0.91±0.07 lbs.  Figuring out that amount has me questioning the accuracy of my scale calibration.  It is still better than no scale at all.

A nice-sized pumpkin.

I found that one of the pumpkins is growing very well.  I have no idea if I will be able to get any food from these.  The pumpkin the seed came from was used as a jack-o-lantern.  The whole plant was an accident as I never intended to plant pumpkins.  There were some pumpkin seeds in the compost I brought with me from my previous residence that decided to start growing out of the compost pile.  Next year, I will be putting them into a more convenient location that doesn’t get in my way when I try access the compost pile.

Squash bugs on my pumpkin plant.

I found some bugs about a week ago on one of my zucchini plants.  Today, I found some on the pumpkin plant.  In both cases, my response was to squash all the bugs I could get my hands on and to remove any eggs I found.  Turns out these are squash bugs.  For now, my response to these pests will be to squash all the bugs I can get my hands on.  If it gets beyond my ability to keep up with them, I will probably get either diatomaceous earth or pyrethrin.  Both of these are almost non-toxic substances.  The first is fossilized shells of microscopic organisms and the latter is extracted from the seed pods of Chrysanthemums and both are safe for use around bees.

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One thought on “Zucchini, Pumpkin and Squash Bugs

  1. To be used safely with pollinators, spray as late in the day as possible. Honeybees will be home and the bumblebees (who forage for much longer) will mostly be gone. The spray needs to contact the insects to be effective and pyrethrums break down readily in the air and in sun. I sprayed my raspberries this way because of stink bugs and Japanese beetles, it seemed to work well and I didn’t need to worry too much.
    Try finding the eggs under the leaves and using tape to pull the eggs off, it was effective but TIME consuming. Good luck!

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